Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (2022)

A simple and reliable 3-ingredient homemade gluten free pasta recipe. Once you’ve tasted this gluten free pasta made from scratch, you’ll never go back to the store-bought stuff. The perfect thing to have on hand for a variety of quick gluten free lunch and dinner recipes.

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (1)

This one is exciting. It has me bouncing in my seat. It has me pushing aside all the other recipes I have planned for you lovely folks. This takes priority, has to take priority.

If you asked me what I miss most in my gluten free diet, pasta would definitely be up there in the Top 10. And I know that for many of you, pasta is the number one thing you miss, crave, dream about. And I’ve read enough disappointed ramblings to know that store-bought gluten free pasta doesn’t even come close to its gluten-containing equivalent.

So last weekend, I decided to tackle the mystery that is gluten free pasta. And as I browsed recipe after recipe, I wasn’t impressed. 7 ingredients or more, mixing your own gluten free flour blend… no thank you. I don’t want to have to buy rice, maize, potato, arrowroot and whateverelse flour and mix them together to make my own blend. I bet you don’t want that either.

You want an EASY and QUICK gluten free pasta recipe that requires only SIMPLE INGREDIENTS that are available in any grocery store.

Well, this is it.

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (2)

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Gluten free pasta ingredients

The ingredients list is as short as it is simple:

  • gluten free flour
  • xanthan gum
  • eggs

That’s all there is to it. The gluten free flour blend I use is an Aldi brand that’s available in the UK (I’m not so sure about the US). It contains rice, potato and maize flour, like most of the gluten free blends out there. Nothing special, the kind of stuff you should be able to find in pretty much any grocery store, nowadays.

The xanthan gum has the job of making the gluten free pasta dough more flexible – it takes the place of gluten. Without it, the dough can crumble and crack, and you really really can’t use a substitute for this.

The eggs bind the dough together: the egg yolks give the pasta its richness, the egg whites add even more elasticity.

There’s no salt, no oil, no water and no other strange ingredients in this gluten free pasta recipe. Three simple ingredients, that’s it.

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (3)

Before we get to the bits and bobs of making this wonderful gluten free pasta – if you like what you’re seeing, subscribe to my newsletter to keep up to date on the latest recipes and tips!

(Video) Gluten-Free Pasta | Basics with Babish

Making the gluten free pasta dough

First, we’ll mix the gluten free flour and xanthan gum together until evenly distributed. We’ll then make a well in the middle and crack in the eggs.

This is a 1-bowl recipe, folks. No fuss.

Next, we’ll scramble the eggs slightly and start mixing in the flour/xanthan mixture. Eventually, we’ll end up with a slightly sticky pasta dough.

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (4)

We’ll turn the dough onto a generously floured surface and knead it for 2 to 3 minutes. Because this is a gluten free pasta dough, there’s no gluten to stretch and “activate”, but kneading ensures a smooth dough with no flour clumps.

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (5)

Rolling out the gluten free pasta dough

The amount of ingredients in the recipe below makes 4 “nests” of tagliatelle-like gluten free pasta, so we’ll cut the dough into four evenly sized pieces. If you want to be extra precise, feel free to weigh the pieces to get them to the same weight.

Wrapping the three pieces of dough we won’t use immediately in cling film ensures they don’t dry out – trying to roll out dried out pasta dough is a nightmare and, trust me, you will want to avoid it.

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (6)

Now, I’ve rolled out the pasta dough with a pasta machine – it’s handy, quick and it doesn’t make your hands tired. Plus, you feel like a total pasta making badass, and that’s a helluva feeling. But if you don’t have a pasta machine, you can easily follow the exactly same procedure with a good ol’ rollin pin and a bit of elbow grease. (But if you expect that these pasta-making adventures will become a frequent occurrence: look into getting a pasta machine. It’s a total time-saver.)

First, we’ll flatten the piece of gluten free pasta dough a bit and flour it generously on both sides. We’ll then pass the flattened piece through the pasta machine, starting on the widest setting. We’ll stay on this setting for a few minutes, so get comfy.

Now, different pasta machines can have different widest settings. What I’m trying to say is that the “widest” setting can produce pasta sheets of different thicknesses. In my case, the widest setting gives pasta sheets about 2 mm thick, which is actually quite thin compared to some other machines. Moral of this side-story: get to know your pasta machine.

If the first roll-through gives an uneven pasta sheet that feels sticky (despite having been dusted with flour) and has streaks of crumbled-looking dough, your pasta dough is too wet, likely because your eggs were larger or had a greater moisture content.

To see what I mean, check out this picture:

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (7)

See the streaks of crumbled-looking dough? It’s too wet. But that’s not a problem – so don’t panic, mmkay?

Fold the dough like a book or letter (into thirds) like this:

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (8)

and dust the outsides with more flour, turn the piece by 90 degrees (so that the smooth edges are left-right, not top-bottom) and feed it agin through the machine. We’ll repeat this process until we get a smooth, velvety gluten free pasta sheet.

Once we’re happy with how it’s looking, we’ll move to a narrower setting on the pasta machine and feed the generously floured sheet through it. (Note that there’s no more folding!) We’ll keep reducing the settings until we get to a sheet about 1 mm thick. (For me, that was just one setting down from the widest one, but it might be different on your pasta machine.)

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (9)

Throughout all of this, it’s quite important to work reasonably quickly so that the pasta doesn’t dry up. (When I say reasonably quickly: you still have time in between to rock out to your favourite jam and take a second to bask in the wonderful feeling of making your own pasta.)

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (10)

Cutting and shaping gluten free pasta

All that’s left to do now is decide on the shape. For beginner pasta-makers, I recommend something easy – like tagliatelle. Especially if it’s your first time making homemade gluten free pasta, you don’t want to experiment too much with pasta shapes. Start simple and work your way up.

You can use a knife or the cutting setting on your pasta machine. I’ve cut it with the latter and, let me tell you, there’s something ridiculously satisfying about feeding a sheet of pasta into the machine, only for perfect tagliatelle to come out on the other side.

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (11)

We’ll toss the cut pasta in some more flour (perfect pretty pasta sticking together is a nightmare) and shape it into a slightly wonky nest. This takes practice (at least, that’s what I’m telling myself). You might tear a few pieces (when I say “you” I mean “I”), but that’s okay. Call it rustic and homemade and, honestly, nobody cares. It’ll still be delicious homemade gluten free pasta in the end.

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You can use the pasta immediately – just toss it into some boiling hot water with a pinch of salt, and within 5 minutes you’ll have a steaming plate of gluten free pasta that tastes just like the “normal” gluten-containing stuff.

Drying gluten free pasta

To dry out the pasta, just leave it out on a cooling/drying rack near a radiator or fireplace (in winter) or on the kitchen counter (in summer) overnight. And when, the next day, you hold the dried tagliatelle nest in your hand, and you realise you’ve made a staple food from scratch and gluten free to boot – it’s perfectly okay to feel mighty proud of yourself.

(Video) How To Make a Gluten Free Flour Blend, a combination of flour and starch to bake gluten free

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But does it taste likepasta???

Simple answer: YES.

Longer answer: I haven’t eaten actual pasta in so long I didn’t feel like I’m a good person to judge this. So I’ve used my parents as taste-testers (they’re brutally honest and they definitely know their pasta), and they tried just the plain, cooked gluten free pasta. No other flavours to mask the inherent pasta flavour.

And the verdict: They couldn’t tell the difference. It tastes, feels and looks like pasta. It’s actually darn good pasta, if I do say so myself.

I’ve since used it in a recipe with a simple pesto (recipe coming soon!) and, as they say, a picture says a thousand words:

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (14)

And… that’s it

This post has turned into something of a gluten free pasta making opus. But I really wanted to go into detail and explain each step in depth.

I know making your own gluten free pasta can sound intimidating and time consuming and just not something you think you’d do. But… it’s none of these things. It’s actually really simple, and SO WORTH IT.

Devoting a few hours on a rainy weekend to pasta making can mean that you’ll have enough gluten free pasta for a few weeks, if not months. And I honestly: don’t see a downside here.

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (15)

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (16)

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  • 1 2/3 cups (200 g) gluten free flour, plus extra for kneading + dusting (Note 1)
  • 1 tsp xanthan gum
  • 3 medium eggs (Note 2)
(Video) GLUTEN FREE PUFF PASTRY | Easy rough puff pastry

To make the gluten free pasta dough:

  • In a bowl,mix together the gluten free flour and xanthan gum until evenly distributed.

  • Make a well in the middle of the flour + xanthan mixture and crack in the eggs.Scramble the eggs slightly and start mixing in the flour + xanthan mixture. Eventually, you will end up with a slightly sticky pasta dough.

    If the dough doesn't come together in a ball and feels crumbly or dry (this can happen if you use a different gluten free flour blend from the one recommended in the recipe), you can add another egg at this point.

    If, on the other hand, the dough feels too wet or soft, you can add a small amount of additional flour.

  • Turn the pasta dough onto a generously floured surface and knead it for 2 - 3 minutes, until you get a smooth ball of pasta dough.

    Because this is a gluten free pasta dough, there’s no gluten to stretch and “activate”, but kneading ensures a smooth dough with no flour clumps.

To roll out the gluten free pasta dough:

  • Cut the dough into four evenly sized pieces.Wrap the three pieces of dough you won’t use immediately in cling film so that they don’t dry out.

  • Flatten one piece of gluten free pasta dough and flour it generously on both sides. Pass the flattened piece through the pasta machine, starting on the widest setting. You will stay on this setting for a few minutes, so get comfy.(See also Note 2)

    Different pasta machines can have different widest settings, so that the “widest” setting can produce pasta sheets of different thicknesses. In my case, the widest setting gives pasta sheets about 2 mm thick, which is actually quite thin compared to some other machines.

  • Fold the rolled-out pasta dough like a book or letter (into thirds, see step-by-step pictures in text) anddust the outsides with flour. Turn the piece by 90 degrees (so that the smooth edges are left-right, not top-bottom) and feed it again through the machine. Repeat this process until you get a smooth, velvety gluten free pasta sheet. (See also Note 2)

    I repeated the folding + rolling steps 5 times before I got a perfectly smooth pasta sheet.

  • Generously dust the pasta sheet with gluten free flour and feed it through the next narrower setting on the pasta machine. (Note that there’s no more folding!) Keep reducing the settings until you get to a sheet about 1 mm thick.

    For me, that was just one setting down from the widest one, but it might be different on your pasta machine.

To cut and shape the gluten free pasta:

  • Using a knife or the cutting setting on your pasta machine, cut the gluten free pasta sheet into tagliatelle (about 1/3 inch / 1 cm wide).

  • Toss the cut pasta in some more flour and shape it into a nest.

To dry the gluten free pasta:

  • To dry the gluten free pasta, place it on a cooling/drying rack near a source of heat (radiator or fireplace in winter, kitchen counter in summer) and leave it to dry at least overnight.

    (Video) Gluten-Free Soft Pretzels (and Assorted Dips!)

  • The next day, check the pasta for dryness – if it still feels damp, leave it for an extra few hours or a day.

To store the gluten free pasta:

  • For the first few days after making it, keep the dried gluten free pasta in an opened container.

    The pasta may still be a bit damp on the inside and closing the container may lead to mould formation.

  • After that, keep the dried pasta in a closed container in a dry place. It should keep for at least 2 - 3 weeks.

To cook the gluten free pasta:

  • To cook the fresh (not dried) gluten free pasta, place it in boiling water, seasoned with a pinch of salt, for 4 - 8 minutes, depending on how well-cooked you like it.

  • To cook the dried gluten free pasta, place it in boiling water, seasoned with a pinch of salt, for 6 - 10 minutes, depending on how well-cooked you like it.

Note 1:The gluten free flour blend I use is the Lidl "Just Free" brand that’s available in the UK (I’m not so sure about the US). It contains rice, potato and maize flour, like most of the gluten free blends out there.

Note 2: The eggs will have a large effect on how wet your final pasta dough is.If the first roll-through on the pasta machine gives an uneven pasta sheet that feels sticky (despite having been dusted with flour) and has streaks of crumbled-looking dough, your pasta dough is too wet, likely because your eggs were larger or had a greater moisture content.

If that is the case, may have to repeat the fold + dust process an extra few times, but you will definitely get asmooth, velvety gluten free pasta sheet in the end.

Looking for more GLUTEN FREE recipes?I’ve got you covered!

Gluten Free Spicy Cheddar Crackers

Salted Caramel Brownie Truffles

Hot Chocolate Cookie Cups

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (20)

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (21)

(Video) How to Make Gluten-Free Cinnamon Buns | At Home With Us

Homemade 3-Ingredient Gluten Free Pasta - The Loopy Whisk (22)

FAQs

What are the ingredients in gluten-free pasta? ›

Many types of gluten-free pasta are made using a blend of different grains, including corn, millet, buckwheat, quinoa, rice and amaranth. The nutritional value of these pasta varieties can vary significantly based on what types of grains are used.

How can I make gluten-free pasta taste better? ›

Use LOTS of salt.

Adding salt to the cooking liquid helps to boost the flavor of pasta. On its own, gluten-free pasta is pretty boring. Salting the water really makes a difference to its flavor profile. You'll want to use about 1 to 1 1/2 Tablespoons of salt per pound of pasta.

Does gluten-free pasta taste the same as regular pasta? ›

Not all gluten-free pastas taste like pasta — the high-protein ones absolutely do not — and many have a mushy or grainy texture, negating the joy of eating pasta. To counteract the texture problems, some brands make their pasta thicker, which gives the noodles a chewy texture (also not great).

Is gluten-free pasta healthy? ›

While it is a better option for those with wheat intolerances, gluten-free pasta is not necessarily any more or less healthy than other pasta types. In fact, the nutrient profiles remain very similar! The only thing that changes is the ingredient list. Gluten-free means low-carb.

Does gluten cause inflammation? ›

For most people, gluten does not cause inflammation and there is no need to avoid it. Many gluten-containing foods should be eaten as part of a healthy diet and may reduce inflammation in the body.

Do potatoes have gluten? ›

Potatoes in their raw form do not contain any gluten and are therefore perfectly suitable for Coeliacs and anyone with special dietary needs. What you do need to be careful about is how they are prepared as any additional ingredients used could contain gluten, providing a 'back door' for them.

Why is my gluten-free pasta gummy? ›

Gluten-free pasta has a tendency to get gummy, mushy, or stick together if it's cooked for too long or too short. It's more finicky than regular pasta that way. And the cook time on the package? Don't trust it.

Should you rinse gluten-free pasta after cooking? ›

Rinse the pasta thoroughly with warm tap water (or cold tap water if you are serving the pasta cold), then toss with oil or butter to ensure that the pasta doesn't stick to itself. If not serving immediately, place into a lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap until ready to serve.

Why do you have to rinse gluten-free pasta? ›

Drain your pasta using a colander (large sieve) but don't rinse it. Rinsing your pasta won't stop it from becoming sticky – all it will do is make your pasta cold. Return the pasta to the saucepan.

Does gluten-free pasta cause bloating? ›

In addition, the introduction of the many refined gluten free grains and starches that are in gluten free products are often upsetting to the micro-flora balance in the intestines, causing gas and bloating.

Is gluten-free pasta good for weight loss? ›

Is there a connection between gluten and weight loss? No. There's absolutely no evidence that simply getting rid of gluten will result in weight loss. But if you eat a gluten-free diet you may make healthier food choices because you're more aware of how to read food labels.

Do oats have gluten? ›

Yes, pure, uncontaminated oats are gluten-free. The U. S. Food and Drug Administration considers oats a gluten-free grain under its gluten-free labeling regulations and only requires that packaged products with oats as an ingredient contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten overall.

Why am I gaining weight on a gluten-free diet? ›

As the lining in your intestines begins to heal on a gluten-free diet, your ability to digest and absorb food recovers. You will absorb more of the nutrients from food, including more calories, leading to weight gain if you continue to eat the same portion size.

Is gluten-free pasta hard to digest? ›

Though it's relatively easy to digest, people with dietary restrictions may want to steer clear, especially those with gluten sensitivity, wheat allergies and autoimmune celiac disease. If you are avoiding gluten for whatever reason, don't worry—you can still enjoy a delicious bowl of pasta.

Does gluten-free pasta turn into sugar? ›

Gluten-free foods that contain carbohydrate will have the same impact on blood glucose as carb-containing foods that do contain gluten. For example, gluten-free pasta does not raise blood glucose levels less than regular pasta.

What are the first signs of being gluten intolerant? ›

Seven symptoms of a gluten intolerance
  • Diarrhea and constipation. Symptoms of gluten intolerance may include constipation, fatigue, headaches, and nausea. ...
  • Bloating. Another very common symptom that people report in cases of gluten intolerance is bloating. ...
  • Abdominal pain. ...
  • Fatigue. ...
  • Nausea. ...
  • Headaches. ...
  • Other symptoms.
6 Jun 2018

What kind of pasta is anti-inflammatory? ›

Choose whole wheat pasta, bean or lentil pasta, rice noodles, bean thread noodles, and whole wheat/buckwheat noodles like Japanese Udon and Soba.

Does gluten affect your joints? ›

New studies suggest that there may be a link between gluten and joint pain. It has long been known that auto-immune forms of arthritis like rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis raise the risk of developing celiac disease.

Does Mayo have gluten? ›

Mayonnaise or “mayo” is typically made from naturally gluten-free ingredients: eggs, oil, vinegar, lemon and sometimes mustard/mustard seed or other spices. Mayo brands that have a gluten-free label have passed thorough testing and are safe to eat for people with celiac disease.

Does popcorn have gluten? ›

A private US firm recently determined that spices commonly used in the US to be gluten free. So, Yes popcorn is considered a naturally gluten-free snack food! Popcorn is enjoyed by many, even those with Celiac disease. However, a person with gluten sensitivities knows their body best.

Are onions gluten-free? ›

White Onion is gluten free. White Onion should be safe for patients with celiac and other gluten-related disorders.

What is Barilla gluten free pasta made of? ›

The pasta is made with corn and rice, is certified gluten free and has the great taste and texture you can feel good about including in your favorite pasta dishes. Barilla Gluten Free pasta is made with non-GMO ingredients.

Does Barilla gluten free pasta contain eggs? ›

Barilla Gluten Free Pasta is made with corn and rice and contains no GMO ingredients. Certified Gluten Free and suitable for vegan and egg free diets.

Is gluten free pasta good for weight loss? ›

Is there a connection between gluten and weight loss? No. There's absolutely no evidence that simply getting rid of gluten will result in weight loss. But if you eat a gluten-free diet you may make healthier food choices because you're more aware of how to read food labels.

Is there gluten in pasta? ›

All wheat pasta contains gluten, including spaghetti, fettuccine, macaroni, lasagne, and ravioli. Not all breakfast cereals contain wheat, but many do, so be sure to check the nutrition labels. Also, be aware that oats are often raised and processed with wheat.

Should I rinse gluten-free pasta? ›

Gluten free pasta tends to absorb more sauce than normal pasta. This means you might need to add more water to the sauce as you mix it through the pasta. Don't rinse your pasta. Drain your pasta using a colander (large sieve) but don't rinse it.

Does oatmeal have gluten? ›

Yes, pure, uncontaminated oats are gluten-free. The U. S. Food and Drug Administration considers oats a gluten-free grain under its gluten-free labeling regulations and only requires that packaged products with oats as an ingredient contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten overall.

What spaghetti sauce is gluten-free? ›

Barilla. All seven Barilla tomato-based sauces are considered gluten-free (to less than 20 parts per million). Flavors include Marinara, Fire-Roasted Marinara, Parmesan & Pecorino, Tomato & Basil, Savory Herb, Roasted Garlic, and Traditional.

Is there gluten in rice? ›

Does Rice Have Gluten? All natural forms of rice — white, brown, or wild — are gluten-free. Natural rice is a great option for people who are sensitive to or allergic to gluten, a protein usually found in wheat, barley, and rye, and for people who have celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by gluten.

Does gluten-free pasta have less carbs? ›

Two offenders that leap to mind are bread and pasta. However, gluten-free does not always mean low-carb, so read labels carefully. For example, you can find many gluten-free bread and pasta options that are still loaded with carbs.

What happens when you go gluten-free for a month? ›

It could reduce inflammation

If you don't have celiac, you could also still see your health improve upon giving up gluten. "When you stop eating gluten, you may experience less bloating, lowered inflammation, clearer skin, more energy, and less brain fog," Snyder says.

What happens when you stop eating gluten? ›

There's no scientific evidence to suggest that people actually go through “withdrawal” when they stop eating gluten. Some people report feeling dizziness, nausea, extreme hunger and even anxiety and depression when they suddenly go from eating a lot of gluten to being gluten-free.

What are the first signs of being gluten intolerant? ›

Seven symptoms of a gluten intolerance
  • Diarrhea and constipation. Symptoms of gluten intolerance may include constipation, fatigue, headaches, and nausea. ...
  • Bloating. Another very common symptom that people report in cases of gluten intolerance is bloating. ...
  • Abdominal pain. ...
  • Fatigue. ...
  • Nausea. ...
  • Headaches. ...
  • Other symptoms.
6 Jun 2018

Can gluten affect thyroid? ›

When gliadin breaches the protective barrier of the gut, and enters the bloodstream, the immune system tags it for destruction. These antibodies to gliadin also cause the body to attack thyroid tissue. This means if you have AITD and you eat foods containing gluten, your immune system will attack your thyroid.

What foods have high levels of gluten? ›

Processed foods that often contain gluten
  • Beer, ale, porter, stout (usually contain barley)
  • Breads.
  • Bulgur wheat.
  • Cakes and pies.
  • Candies.
  • Cereals.
  • Communion wafers.
  • Cookies and crackers.

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3. 4 Ingredient LEMON BARS | Easy to Make + Naturally Gluten Free
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6. Fresh Homemade Pasta - Gluten Free & regular wheat pasta - Adventures in Everyday Cooking
(Adventures in Everyday Cooking)

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